Last edited by Dojar
Sunday, October 18, 2020 | History

8 edition of The Land and Property Rights of Women and Orphans in the Context of HIV and AIDS found in the catalog.

The Land and Property Rights of Women and Orphans in the Context of HIV and AIDS

Case Studies From Zimbabwe

by Kaori Izumi

  • 344 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by Human Sciences Research Council .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • AIDS: social aspects,
  • Children,
  • Land rights,
  • Women"s studies,
  • Social Science,
  • Gender Studies,
  • Sociology,
  • Sociology - Rural,
  • Women"s Studies - General,
  • Social Science / Women"s Studies,
  • Inheritance and succession,
  • Land tenure,
  • Women"s rights,
  • Zimbabwe

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages96
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL11202141M
    ISBN 100796921350
    ISBN 109780796921352

    this use of human rights in a purely discriminatory context does little to explain the true meaning of human rights. Instead, human rights may even take on an unin- HIV-AIDS afflicts large numbers of populations in many countries (United Nations, ). the human rights of women receive additional consideration within. HIV/AIDS, just in Africa, has made over 11 million children AIDS orphans (children under the age of 15 who have lost one or both parents to HIV/AIDS). Relatives have usually cared for orphans in Africa, as in many other places too, but HIV/AIDS has made that arrangement difficult.

    These women and their children (who may end up AIDS orphans) are likely to face not only social stigma against people affected by HIV/AIDS but also deprivations caused by property rights. The Namibian Dimension: The three issues most critical to Namibia’s women and girls are fundamental to the country’s achievement of the MDGs and Vision goals. Gender-based violence, the multiple impacts of HIV and AIDS on women and girls and gender inequality in political participation are manifestations of a deeply-rooted belief.

      Intimate partner violence (IPV), like all kinds of violence, is a violation of human rights. Violence committed by an intimate partner – whether a current or former spouse, boyfriend, girlfriend or dating partner – has devastating physical, emotional, financial and social effects on women, children, families and communities around the world.   Attention to AIDS orphans is also associated with the scale and nature of funding available for interventions relating to AIDS, in comparison to funding for social issues more generally. The US government-funded President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) spent over $5 billion on bilateral HIV/AIDS programmes in (PEPFAR, ).


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The Land and Property Rights of Women and Orphans in the Context of HIV and AIDS by Kaori Izumi Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Land and Property Rights of Women and orphans in the context of HIV and AIDS. Case studies from Zimbabwe. In Zimbabwe, as in many other parts of Africa, agriculture is the principal source of livelihood for widows and orphans. Within this reality, a groundbreaking study was commissioned to investigate the land and property rights of women and orphans in Zimbabwe in the context of HIV/AIDS.

Within this reality, a groundbreaking study was commissioned to investigate the land and property rights of women and orphans in Zimbabwe in the context of HIV/AIDS. It also examines the coping strategies, in terms of land-related livelihoods, adopted by widows and other vulnerable women affected by.

Reclaiming Our Lives. HIV and AIDS, womens land and property rights and livelihoods in southern and East Africa - Narratives and responses. Property-grabbing from widows and orphans began long before the HIV and AIDS pandemic.

However, the scale of HIV infection rates, stigmatisation and the social and economic vulnerability of widows and orphans have worsened the situation. In Zimbabwe, as in many other parts of Africa, agriculture is the principal source of livelihood for widows and orphans.

Within this reality, a groundbreaking study was commissioned to investigate the land and property rights of women and orphans in Zimbabwe in the context of HIV/AIDS. It also examines the coping strategies, in terms of land-related livelihoods, adopted by widows and other.

The connection between food insecurity and risky sexual behavior is empirically well established (Wieser et al. Securing the property rights of widows and children may therefore not only mitigate a number of the social impacts of HIV/AIDS in Africa (ICRW ).

A study in Brazil indicated that women’s secure land rights are associated with a woman’s increased ability to participate in household decision-making (Mardon, ).

Conversely, insecure land tenure and property rights for women can contribute to the spread of HIV and to a weakened ability to cope with the consequences of AIDS. This brief examines the importance of women's land and property rights in the contexts of HIV and AIDS, violence against women, and food security.

Land and property rights increase women's autonomy—decreasing their dependence on men and entrapment in abusive relationships, enabling greater control over sexual relations, and improving their ability. Women’s property and inheritance rights can play a significant role in potentially breaking the cycle of HIV and AIDS.

Evidence increasingly suggests that where women’s property rights are upheld, women as heads and/or primary caregivers of AIDS-affected households are better able to manage or mitigate the impact of the epidemic on their families and communities as well as further prevent the spread of HIV.

In the context of HIV, women’s rights to inheritance and property are “ a crucial factor in reducing women’s vulnerability to violence and HIV, as well as empowering women to cope with the social and economic impact of the epidemic at the household level”3(see also chap.

III.H.2). Book Description: The expansion of married women's property rights was a main achievement of the first wave of feminism in Latin America.

As Carmen Diana Deeere and Magdalena Leon reveal, however, the disjuncture between rights and actual ownership remains vast. Realizing women’s land, property and housing rights is an integral part of the gender-responsive implementation of the Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Prevailing gender inequalities both in public and private spheres, undermine women’s exercise of their rights to land, property and housing. HIV and AIDS, children’s livelihoods and property rights 3 Customary laws and statutory laws in inheritance rights 5 Traditional practices in the context of children’s property rights in Zambia and Kenya 6 Areas of intervention 7 Background and the processes leading to the study 8 Study aim and objectives 9.

A woman’s right to own and control land is directly linked to the protection of her human rights, such as security, autonomy and freedom from discrimination.

While several existing international human rights and policy instruments support this principle, a new publication highlights that there is an urgent need to adopt laws, policies and programmes to implement it effectively.

The spread of HIV/AIDS and the stigma associated with the disease have only made women’s land rights more precarious. Widows of men who die from the. women’s human rights in Africa is the pervasive denial of a woman’s right to inherit land and other property. In many traditional societies in sub-Saharan Africa, land use, hous-ing, and the transfer of land and housing between generations is reg-ulated by customary law, which largely excludes women from proper-ty ownership and inheritance.

Ownership of land and property empowers women and provides income and security. Without resources such as land, women have limited say in household decision-making, and no recourse to the assets during crises. This often relates to other vulnerabilities such.

When women’s property and inheritance rights are upheld, women acting as heads of households, or as primary care givers of households affected by HIV and AIDS, are better able to mitigate the negative economic and social consequences International and regional standards.

Women’s equal rights to access, own and control land, adequate housing and property are firmly recognized under international law. 7 However, at country level, the persistence of.

Limited and insecure rights in, access to and control over land and property make women and orphans vulnerable to “property grabbing”; this is a situation in which orphans, widows or women who are separated from their husbands are often stripped of their belongings by family members.

HIV/AIDS and women’s property rights – if women’s lack of rights increases household poverty and women’s own vulnerability to infection, and if securing these rights can mitigate the impoverishing impact of the epidemic. The first section of this report explores the relationship between HIV/AIDS and women’s property and inheritance.

Kaori Izumi is the author of The Land and Property Rights of Women and Orphans in the Context of HIV and AIDS ( avg rating, 0 ratings, 0 reviews, publ.Women. Disentangling HIV and AIDS stigma in Ethiopia, Tanzania and Zambia. Washington DC: ICRW; 6.

Lack of economic security: In many countries, women do not have property and inheritance rights, and lack access to and control over other economic resources (e.g. land ownership, assets, employment, household wages). Amandine Bollinger, The Role of Residential Homes in the Care of Orphans Affected by HIV, Childhood, Youth and Violence in Global Contexts, /, (), ().

Crossref Naheed Ahmed, Most at-risk populations: contextualising HIV prevention programmes targeting marginalised groups in Zanzibar, Tanzania, African Journal of.